#190 - Hannah Arendt

Continuing their recent trend of purposefully discussing anyone but old white men, Connor and Dan spend this week discussing the political philosophy of German philosopher Hannah Arendt. She escaped the Nazis in Germany and spent the rest of her life analyzing how something like a totalitarian regime takes hold in the modern world. Also discussed this episode: glowing pucks in the NHL, the banality of evil, and Connor's new Lord of the Rings centric segment! This smokin' ep is brought to by Budsy, the Grubhub of weed!

#189 - Kierkegaard (feat. Andy from The Panpsycast)

Connor and Dan are nearing 200 episodes, so they figured it was about time they had on a guest who knows what they hell they are talking about. Andy from The Panpsycast joins our two regular hosts from all the way across the pond to discuss their old pal Soren Kierkegaard, his thoughts on Christianity, individualism, and how to be a professional sad-sack. It's a good ep! If you enjoy it, definitely check out Andy's podcast and keep listening to Drunken Philosophy because he will certainly be back!

#188 - Ubuntu

This week your hosts take a break from the endless slog of old white men discussed on this podcast to learn a little about the African philosophy of ubuntu. It means realizing yourself through the existence of others, the importance of sharing and communal life, and understanding that the Self does not exist without the Other. In other words, good times! Also discussed: Connor unveils a new cheers he learned, the moral responsibility of YouTubers, and having Germans stay at your house.

#187 - Jean-Francois Lyotard

We regret to inform you that it is time to once again talk about postmodernism and the death of the meta-narrative. This week, Connor and Dan discuss the philosophy of Lyotard, a modern French thinker with a penchant for the postmodern. Also discussed: how your hosts absorb news stories in the modern age, coming to grips with your cultural roots, and Connor's vehement hatred of an HBO comedy fundraiser. Enjoy!

#186 - Bicameralism

What was it like to be a human being before we attained real consciousness? Turns out a guy named Julian Jaynes had an idea about it back in 1976, and this week Connor and Dan take a crack at understanding it. It's called the bicameral mind and it will mess you up dude. Anyone who has seen Westworld will know what's up but for everyone else, be prepared to question everything you think you know about history and the human mind! Or not, that's fine too!

#185 - The Stranger

It's time to open yourself to the gentle indifference of the world, dear listeners! This week on Drunken Philosophy, Dan read a book and is going to give a formal book report. It just so happens that book is The Stranger by Albert Camus, so it's a little applicable to the podcast. Also, Connor returns with a new Loser Cruiser, they discuss the appropriate response to tragedy, and, of course, The Cure.

#184 - Object-Oriented Ontology

It's Halloween time, which can mean only one thing: Connor and Dan forgot to plan a Halloween episode! So spooky! So instead, they decided to talk about Object-Oriented Ontology which is a contemporary metaphysical philosophy that's (you guessed it) all about objects and how they are just as important as humans in the grand scheme of existence. Also discussed: Toy Story video games, trees falling in forests, and Dan has a head cold. Also, the pre-ramble is all about Dan's new movie "I Woke Up And I'm Sad."

#183 - Frankfurt Cases

Are we responsible for the choices we make if we weren't able to choose otherwise? Does a deterministic universe still have culpability? Is Harry Frankfurt the guy who invented the hotdog? Some of these questions will be answered on this week's episode of Drunken Philosophy as your hosts explore the various implication of Frankfurt cases. Also discussed: Connor not being good enough to be hypnotized, which Iraq war was the best, and Dan's lamp goes out.

#182 - Political Dimensions Of Time

Sure, you've thought a lot about what time it is. But have you ever thought about what time is? Or, perhaps more importantly, what time means? That's what your hosts are discussing this week on DP as they take a look at Brendan De Paor-Moore's new schema for time and analysis of how time has become intertwined with our culture and history. Also: the new Shadow Of War video game, being addicted to Twitter, and Dan hating Connor for not being on more of a soul-sucking schedule.

#181 - Peter Singer and Doing Harm

[Trigger Warning: This episode contains discussion of sexual assault of the physically disabled] Your hosts are back with another extra sloppy late night podcast and they decided this would be the perfect time to dig into the complex issue of utilitarian ethics and sexual assault. They're talking about Peter Singer's NY Times article from earlier this year and Connor is immediately back on his heels, assuming he's going to get tricked into saying something offensive. Does he sound like a monster? You be the judge! Just so y'all know, this episode is a tough one, but it's important.

#180 - Roland Barthes

Connor and Dan are back from their little movie excursion to discuss the semiotic philosophy of Roland Barthes. They're talking signs, they're talking signifiers, they're talking Che Guevara t-shirts and bottles of red wine, baby! Also, they get into the individual's relationship with art while Connor preheats his oven for way too long. Enjoy!

#179 - God's Not Dead Too

Get your tickets, ladies and gents! Because it's another rendition of Drunken Philosophy at the Movies. This week, Connor and Dan take one for the collective team and watch God's Not Dead 2, the highly anticipated sequel to the straight-to-video Christian-focused feature and insult to Nietszche's memory, God's Not Dead. This movie is bonkers and barely related to philosophy despite stealing it's title from a famous philosophical text, but it provided lots of catharsis for your hosts. Enjoy the little break from learning, the pod will be back next week with more straight up philosophy.

#178 - Zizek, Lacan, And Jaws

Are you afraid to go in the water? You might be after this episode! Connor and Dan discuss the 1975 film Jaws, specifically how it can be used to explore the theories of Slavoj Zizek and Jacques Lacan. Does the shark represent fascism or capitalism? Does art reflect ideology or is that just the viewer forcing the issue? Also, what kinds of a pants did Dan wear when he was a chubby little kid? Spoilers abound for a movie that came out forty years ago, so consider yourself warned. 

#177 - David Chalmers on Virtual Reality

After numerous technical difficulties, your brave hosts managed to put out another podcast this week about, what else, technology! Specifically virtual reality and how it can be used to answer complex questions about philosophy. Australian philosophy David Chalmers makes the argument that virtual reality is as valuable as "real" reality, and Dan surprisingly agrees. Connor is just excited he gets to talk about video games again. Enjoy!

#176 - Ritual And Ethics

Does repeating a physical action help you be a better person? Ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius might say yes, but modern day American guy Connor Holmes would definitely say no. This week, your hosts discuss the use of ritual and ceremony in Chinese ethical philosophy. For more on this subject you can look up Harvard professor Michael Puett's work. And for more discussion on why zoos are lame and what old racist Comedy Central shows were like, keep listening to this podcast!

#175 - Philosophical Zombies

Halloween came a little earlier this year on Drunken Philosophy! This week, Connor and Dan discuss the idea of a philosophical zombie, i.e. a physically identical human being that lacks consciousness, and decide whether or not they create problems for physicalists. Philosophers mentioned include David Chalmers, Daniel Dennett, and at least one other, maybe! Also discussed, the career of Daniel Day Lewis, a review of Game of Thrones in emoji form, and Connor's Top Five Berries! (Apologies for a little buzzing at the beginning on Connor's audio, I swear it goes away)

#174 - Giles Deleuze (Part 1)

There is no identity, there is only difference. Time is simply repetition. Everything you think you know about thought, you're thinking about wrong. Feeling confused yet? Welcome to the philosophy of Giles Deleuze. This week, Connor and Dan do their best to wade into the deep murky waters of this French philosopher's influential metaphysics. Also discussed: What Connor would do during the purge, who's still listening to "Mr. Brightside," and how the hell you pronounce Imogen Heap.

#173 - Ordinary Language Philosophy

This episode is for all you ordinary people out there. This week, Connor and Dan discuss the philosophical methodology known as Ordinary Language Philosophy. This was a loosely head together school of thought that prioritized focus on ordinary language in philosophy and claimed the best way to understand metaphysical concepts was to understand the way they were used in language. Talk about a snooze! Also, Connor rants a bit about people who go to music festivals (even though he just went to one) and you get a little peak into the writer's room for the next Minions movie. All in all, it's an episode.

#172 - Jacques Lacan

It only took 172 episodes for this podcast to devolve into a low-budget therapy session. This week, Connor and Dan take a look at the psychoanalysis of Jacques Lacan, specifically his theory about the Mirror Phase and symbolic order of consciousness. This is some heady stuff, ladies and germs, but your hosts are trying their best. Also, Connor takes old people down a peg, we get to hear what your hosts want to be when they grow up, and they once again discuss the importance of language. Good stuff!

#171 - Alvin Plantinga

Can you be a logical thinking philosopher and still believe in God? Specifically the Christian conception of an all-knowing, all-loving God? Why are you asking us? Go Google it. This week on Drunken Philosophy, Connor and Dan discuss famously God-believing philosopher Alvin Plantinga and break down some of his most well-known arguments. Also, there's some movie talk (obviously) and Connor, having very limited experience, really takes New York bagels to task.